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          When asked to describe the Transformers franchise, I will often reference the late Roger Ebert’s review of Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen, in which he described the film as “a horrible experience of unbearable length”. Unfortunately, Transformers: Age of Extinction is a painfully similar sequel to its three horrendous predecessors. The plot, which essentially contains the same “ancient evil rising” and “government conspiracy” elements as the first three films, is once again a way to connect it numerous action sequences, which despite complex and visually stunning special effects, are weak on an emotional level. The presence of new Transformers and new actors does nothing to mask the main issue: the dialogue is unrealistic and never seems to sell any of the film’s situations or characters. It’s especially disappointing that Academy Award nominated talents such as Mark Wahlberg and Stanley Tucci are wasted on the most generic characters imaginable (Wahlberg plays a hard on his luck father, where Tucci plays an imaginer clearly based off Steve Jobs), where the lesser cast members such as Nicola Peltz, Kelsey Grammer, and Jack Reynor are forced to choke through the terrible dialogue and in turn deliver bad performances. There are odd attempts at humor that never seem to be particularly funny or realistic; in fact the only humorous aspects of the film are it’s “dramatic moments”, which are feel so melodramatic and cheesy that they become laughably bad. The editing is also disappointing, as the action sequences are not evenly spaced out and leave the film’s 165 minute runtime feeling overlong and distracting. Transformers: Age of Extinction could’ve at least been a campy fun summer blockbuster, but the film’s intent on melodrama, overlong action sequences, and embarrassing dialogue make it one of the worst movies of the year. Grade: -D

You can read my extended thoughts on About.com:

http://kidstvmovies.about.com/od/kidsfamliymovies2014/fl/Transformers-Age-of-Extinction.htm

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